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A CleanAir Greece

A CleanAir Greece

by jonas jonathan_david zeeroday | updated November 09, 2018

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A CleanAir Greece is a project tackling a major problem for public health in Greece: non-compliance with smoke-free laws in public places (venues, indoor offices, health care facilities etc). The core of the project is to develop an easy-to-use web application to help reduce the amount of exposure to secondhand smoke indoors. Generally speaking, non-compliance with smoke-free laws can be caused by several interrelated factors such as a lack of financial and human resources (necessary to run inspections), a lack of data (necessary to know what is really going on in terms of  compliance) or a general lack of commitment from public authorities.

The project is designed to first reduce the “lack of data” in order to influence other factors and obstacles for the enforcement of compliance with the smoke-free laws. Being able to collect and map accurate data through crowdsourcing would enable different actors like public authorities, NGOs or individuals to get a clear picture about the current situation of smoking inside public places. Subsequently, they could start developing new strategies to avoid or reduce it. Without accurate data, however, reduction of secondhand smoke in public places would be nearly impossible. A CleanAir Greece believes that crowdsourcing is an innovative approach for improving compliance with smoke-free laws and reducing the damages of secondhand smoke on the Greek society.

Why secondhand smoke? 

A CleanAir Greece is not designed for preventing individuals from smoking but to reduce the effects of passive smoke on non-smokers. Scientific evidence has unequivocally established that there is no safe level of exposure to secondhand smoke. It is indeed likely to directly cause deaths, diseases and disabilities among individuals. Moreover, societies and health care systems can also indirectly suffer from it. Ensuring totally smoke-free environments in public places is therefore the only way for protecting the general public from the damages of secondhand smoke.

Why Greece?

A CleanAir Greece is starting out in Greece due to several reasons. First, strict indoor smoke-free laws for public places have been adopted a long time ago but their implementation is still lacking. Secondly, several players have also been working actively on raising the public’s awareness about the detrimental effect of secondhand smoke. As a result, public surveys show that the number of people supporting smoking bans and asking for their enforcement is very high. Moreover, an efficient, wide-spread tool for collecting accurate data about non-complying public places is still missing. All of these reasons justify the choice of Greece as a favorable place for this project.

Who?

The A CleanAir Greece team consists of two university students who started this project during the Open17challenge and are now fully working on it during the 2 months SDG summer school.

Jonathan Martin is a swiss social science undergraduate student at the University of Geneva. Although his major is in Political Science, he also attends other complementary lectures in order to have a clearer and broader picture of the main issues that Social Sciences are tackling (e.g. Political Economy, Economic History and Geography). He has a strong interest in the main challenges regarding the development of our future society and is therefore working on a project related to the SDGs (Social Development Goals) together with another student, Jonas Kühl. Jonas is currently studying in a master’s program in Standardization, Social Regulation and Sustainable Development at University of Geneva. His background is in Political Science but especially spending a few years in China after his undergraduate studies has facilitated his interest in topics related to sustainability and his decision to focus particularly on such issues in his further studies. Moreover, his main professional experience is in the field of international relations where he interned with different institutions like GIZ, the German chamber or the foreign office of a well-known German political foundation (Konrad Adenauer Foundation).

 

July 5, 2018 at 8:08 AM
Created by jonathan_david and jonas
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On the basis of the given feedback, we identified the following short-term goals:

  • To inquire about potential collaborations with existing apps, projects, programmes (Who could we eventually join?)
  • To think more about potential incentives (How are we incentivize the people to become users of our app? How do other platforms do it?)
  • To research about other existing projects on tobacco compliance (Is there already somebody working on the same issue? Is there anything we could learn from them?)
  • To meet with a WHO team working on the same issue(Could we join them? Learn from them?)
  • To research about legislation and regulation of rating applications (What is allowed /  forbidden for rating applications/platforms (in Greece))
  • To discuss the use of sensors (Could sensors be used e.g. for our pilot, to verify the accurancy of the data ? How expensive would it be? How operational is it?)

July 24, 2018 at 6:49 AM
Created by jonas and jonathan_david
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# Welcome!

In this Readme file you find all the necessary information about Smake it free.

## What are we doing?  

1.    We’re **collecting** information about Greek restaurants, coffee shops and bars regarding the level of smoking tobacco inside.

2.    We’re **disseminating** the collected data which allows people willing to protect their health to find the safest place nearby where the exposure to secondhand smoke is the lowest.

## Why?

Scientific evidence has unequivocally established that exposure to tobacco smoke causes death, disease and disability. There is no safe level of second-hand smoke exposure and even occasional exposure can lead to serious and often fatal diseases. In Greece, strict non-smoking laws in public places have been adopted for a long time but the implementation is lacking. As a sufficient, wide-spread tool for finding safe places is missing yet, with the help of the people our project aims to establish a more far-reaching web-platform that offers alternatives for aware people.

## How can people contribute?

If you’re living in Greece or visiting the country you can help us establishing our network by rating restaurants, coffe shops, and bars you went to in terms of their level of smoking. 

## Who are we?

At the moment, we are a team of two students from the University of Geneva: Jonas and Jonathan.

We were starting this project in the course of the Open Seventeen Challenge 2018 ([more information here](http://openseventeen.org/)) and keep working on it throughout the SDG Summer School 2018 ([more information here](http://www.gt-initiative.org/en/summer-school-2018.html)).

## Contact

Thanks for visiting us! We are always open for feedback so don't hesitate to contact us [here](Jonas.Kuehl@etu.unige.ch)!

https://github.com/JonDavMartin/Smake-it-free

July 24, 2018 at 6:53 AM
Created by jonathan_david and jonas
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Introduction during which we were told about the origins of GTI (Geneva-Tsinghua initiative), of the Summer School (as part of this GTI initiative) and of the SDGs (2.0 version of the Millenium Development Goals (MDGs)).

The Sustainable Development Goals (with their targets and indicators) were adopted in 2015 after by the UN member states. They are the second generation of UN goals, succeeding to the MDGs (which were set by Kofi Annan and his team). Their deadline is set for 2030. Compared to the MDGs, the SDGs‘ scope is much broader and includes more environmental issues.

The GTI has been discussed during the World Economic Forum (WEF) in Davos. Many important individuals, including Xi Jinping, Doris Leuthard, B. Debarbieux took part in the signing session.

The Summer School is part of the Geneva-Tsinghua initiative. The purpose of the former is to promote the SDGs and their implementation, particularly among young people and students in a multidisciplinary approach who have the potential to become future leaders.

July 24, 2018 at 8:53 AM
Created by jonas and jonathan_david
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1) Under Discussion:

idea 2.0:

- Incentives: "smakecoins" ?.. discounts in smoke-free venues after rating accordingly to the average rating of the day?

- Join other apps: Athensbook, tripadvisor, e-table

- Learn from other similar programs? cf WHO: Siddhartha

idea 3.0:

- gamifying the phase of the data collection to incentivize the people to collect data

2) We identified and discussed the main challenges that our project would face:

         (1) How to make sure people will engage?

         (2) How to make sure people’s data is reliable?

 

July 24, 2018 at 9:26 AM
Created by jonas and jonathan_david
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1) Introduction to the Fablab

Some machines (Vector Design, 3D printer and Lasercutting) were presented to us as well as their fonctions. Lasercutting can for example carve into soft surfaces like wood, stone (not metal). 3D printer can print in plastic special-shaped objects and forms.

2) Introduction to Documenting 

Introduction to the major practice of "documentation" which is something essential although people often underestimate it. Documentation consists in writing down every single step that a team is taking in order to have everything they've done at their disposal on a paper or a webpage. A good documentation allows a team to quickly present other people (potential investors, collaborators etc) their idea and what has already been achieved/is still to be done by them. Documentation is particularly important for open source and public projects for it allows other people to get the idea of their project just by reading the documents.

3) Introduction to Citizen science

In an introduction to citizen science we spoke about history of science, the evolution of scientific professionalism in the last centuries and about the quite recent distinction between professionals and amateurs in the scientific fields (which wasn't the case before the 20th century). We finally reviewed the advantages that citizen science could bring to both society and science. Citizen science therefore shows the importance of collaboration between the people and the professionals in the field of science (e.g. in order to collect data). 

3) Introduction to Opensource and the Shenzhen ecosystem

Shenzhen, nowadays one of the most innovative places in China in terms of high-tech technologies development, is one of those places suited for catchy introductions which we had through a video of David Li. After David explained in the video the importance of open source for hardware development (open source allows people not to start a project "from scratch" but to "put the pieces together", basically saves a lot of time by using what others already developed), we were lucky enough to directly talk to him in person on skype. 

We spoke about the main issue of open source technologies: intellectual property (when you put something in open source there is a danger of somebody coming and "stealing" your idea). Still, the advantages of open sources are great (saves time, money, effort and leads people towards collaboration, mutual help, towards more innovation and development).

July 25, 2018 at 6:40 PM
Created by jonathan_david
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Introduction to GTI, the summer school and the SDG -

Introduction during which we were told about the origins of GTI (Geneva-Tsinghua initiative), of the Summer School (as part of this GTI initiative) and of the SDGs (2.0 version of the Millenium Development Goals (MDGs)).

The Sustainable Development Goals (with their targets and indicators) were adopted in 2015 after by the UN member states. They are the second generation of UN goals, succeeding to the MDGs (which were set by Kofi Annan and his team). Their deadline is set for 2030. Compared to the MDGs, the SDGs‘ scope is much broader and includes more environmental issues.

The GTI has been discussed during the World Economic Forum (WEF) in Davos. Many important individuals, including Xi Jinping, Doris Leuthard, B. Debarbieux took part in the signing session.

The Summer School is part of the Geneva-Tsinghua initiative. The purpose of the former is to promote the SDGs and their implementation, particularly among young people and students in a multidisciplinary approach who have the potential to become future leaders.

 

Introduction to the Fablab – Emmanuel Kellner

Introduction of the function and usage of different machines (Vector Design, 3D printer and Laser-cutting). Laser-cutting can for example carve into soft surfaces like wood, stone (not metal), 3D printer can be used to print specific objects and forms out of plastic that do not need to be ordered in a shop.

 

Introduction to documenting – Oday, Julieta

Introduction to the major practice of "documentation" which is essential although people often underestimate its role. Documentation consists of writing down every single step that a team is taking in order to have everything they've done at their disposal on a paper or a webpage. A good documentation allows a team to quickly present other people (potential investors, collaborators etc.) their idea and what has already been achieved/is still to be done by them. Documentation is particularly important for open source and public projects for it allows other people to get the idea of their project just by reading the documents. Two tools (SDGinProgress and Github) were presented to us in order to use it.

 

Introduction to Citizen Science - Strasser

In an introduction to citizen science we spoke about the history of science, the evolution of scientific professionalism in the last centuries and about the quite recent distinction between professionals and amateurs in the scientific fields (which wasn't the case before the 20th century). We finally reviewed the advantages that citizen science could bring to both society and science. Citizen science therefore shows the importance of collaboration between the people and professionals in the field of science (e.g. in order to collect data).

 

Shenzhen ecosystem and Power of opensource

Shenzhen is one of the most innovative places in China in terms of high-tech technologies development and thus a place suited for catchy introductions which we had through a video of David Li. In the beginning, David explained the importance of open source for hardware development (open source allows people not to start a project "from scratch" but to "put the pieces together" which basically helps to save a lot of time).

Then, we spoke about the main issue of open source technologies: intellectual property (when you put something in open source there is a danger of somebody coming and "stealing" your idea). Still, the advantages of open sources are great (saves time, money, effort and leads people towards collaboration, mutual help, towards more innovation and development).

 

Learning tour on CERN

  1. Prototyping at Idea Square (Lesson on how to prototype your ideas going through a set of questions (Why, what, how and when)
  2. Citizen science and crowdsourcing (an example on how C.S.  can help scientists track and monitor the cosmic rays)
  3. Presentation about rapid Mapping (UNOSAT) which is a useful technological tool helping UN entities solve some of their problems
  4. Workshop: benefit of Openness and of communities outreach

 

ICRC: data protection

July 26, 2018 at 3:36 AM
Created by jonathan_david and jonas
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We were researching about how we can integrate the use of cameras and pictures into our platform and the public’s rating of non-compliance with smoke-free venues in public places. Firstly, we were looking at the possibility of thermal imaging to detect if people smoke inside where it is not allowed but apparently nearly all smartphone cameras are still not designed to take thermal pictures and the results of thermal imaging apps were not promising. To integrate it in our project, nowadays costly special devices would still be necessary.

A second idea was to make use of image comparison. Theoretically, if you take similar pictures at different times it could be possible to detect some differences and smoking inside could possibly change the indoor air quality to such an extend that the camera can detect differences. The problem in this case was that smoke can rarely be seen on images (especially on regular smartphone cameras) and 80 percent of cigarette smoke is invisible.

The final feature that might be interesting for our project is artificial intelligence (AI). Here, customers could just upload a photo they took of objects that indicate that smoke-free laws are not complied (ashtrays, stubbed out cigarettes on the floor, smoking customers) and a technology verifies if the information is actually true. AI might not be that advanced yet to recognize different types of ashtrays or taken from a few meters away, so an interesting alternative for verification might be cheap human intelligence tools such as Amazon Mechanical Turk.

July 26, 2018 at 6:02 AM
Created by jonas
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2002: First law banning smoking in public and private workplaces, in transportation, in hospitals and other health facilities, as well as in educational institutions. Law remained mostly ineffective, since the manager of the workplace was able to define if its place is a smoking place or not.

2008: New law prohibits smoking (and consumption of tobacco products in other ways), in all workplaces (including private), transportation stations, taxis and passenger ships as well as in all enclosed public spaces (including nightclubs). Some exceptions could be granted depending on the size and number of employees and were applied mainly upon request and with significant limitations.

2010: Ban on smoking was generalized to every closed public space; Atriums/patios or an area with a sliding or detachable roof, and any area covered and concurrently enclosed in its perimeter by any means is also covered by the term “internal area”.

2011: Exceptions for casinos and establishments offering live music like bars and nightclubs with a size of 300 m²: the smoking area, however, cannot be larger than 50% of the total area of the premise. The separation from the rest of the establishment must be carried by partitions of at least two meters.

Fines:
Smokers in public places will be fined 50 to 500 euros, according to the circumstances.
Owners of businesses tolerating or not preventing customers from smoking will be fined 500 to 10,000 euros. Repeating offenders will be fined and their license will be revoked after five offenses.

Enforcement of the smoke-free laws is lacking. For instance, in 2015 no fines at all were collected.

2017: E-cigarettes fall under the same legislation as other tobacco products

 

https://www.tobaccocontrollaws.org/legislation/country/greece/laws

https://el.wikipedia.org/wiki/%CE%91%CF%80%CE%B1%CE%B3%CF%8C%CF%81%CE%B5%CF%85%CF%83%CE%B7_%CE%BA%CE%B1%CF%80%CE%BD%CE%AF%CF%83%CE%BC%CE%B1%CF%84%CE%BF%CF%82_%CF%83%CF%84%CE%B7%CE%BD_%CE%95%CE%BB%CE%BB%CE%AC%CE%B4%CE%B1

http://www.iefimerida.gr/news/11739/%C2%AB%CF%84%CF%83%CE%B9%CE%B3%CE%B1%CF%81%CF%8C%CF%83%CE%B7%CE%BC%CE%BF%C2%AB-%CF%83%CE%B5-%CE%BC%CF%80%CE%BF%CF%85%CE%B6%CE%BF%CF%8D%CE%BA%CE%B9%CE%B1-%CE%BA%CE%B1%CE%B9-%CE%BA%CE%B1%CE%B6%CE%AF%CE%BD%CE%B1

http://www.pkm.gov.gr/default.aspx?lang=el-GR&page=455

https://www.euractiv.com/section/health-consumers/news/smoking-ban-law-in-greece-still-on-the-shelf/

https://www.euractiv.com/section/health-consumers/news/commission-urges-greece-to-implement-smoking-ban-in-public-places/

http://greece.greekreporter.com/2018/01/31/greek-health-ministry-to-enforce-dormant-anti-smoking-law/

July 26, 2018 at 6:07 AM
Created by jonas
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Link of our survey on Ushahidi: https://acleanairgreece.ushahidi.io/views/map

July 26, 2018 at 6:23 AM
Created by jonathan_david and jonas
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2.0

I) Second Idea

In contrast to idea 1.0, our second idea was to focus on both complying and non-complying venues. The main rationale was to actively promote compliance by showcasing the complying venues through a mobile and web application. This application would indeed provide the following tasks: 

  1. It would allow customers to rate a restaurant, cafe, or bar regarding the level of smoking tobacco inside --> collection of data
  2. It would disseminate this data through a map that allows individuals to find the safest place nearby where the exposure to secondhand smoke is the lowest.

What we were hoping is that non-complying venues would start complying with the smoke-free laws because of the many advantages that compliance could bring them  (they could get a better environment for their employees and themselves + reduce their health expenditures + new customers who would look for smoke-free venues with the help of the app).

II) Feedback

   A) cf attached feedback 

   B) We pitched our initial idea once more to some WHO and ITU representatives. We deduced 2 main aspects from their feedback:

      1) How are we going to incentivize the people to use our app? How are we going to convince the people to engage with us? Who will first engage with us (early adopters) ?

      2) Who might be potential exiting programs/projects/rating apps to join? Shouldn't we build on something that is already existing instead of starting everything from scratch?

III) Obstacles to this idea

1) Some initiatives are already doing something similar (namely Akapnos and Nosmoke.gr) and it turns out to be quite fruitless (not scalable enough, too slow). An option for us could then be to collaborate with them but we didn't manage to establish contact with them (didn't answer to our emails).

1) We see more potential in providing this data to the Greek public because it highly disapproves non-compliance and is therefore likely to change its behavior (e.g. start going more frequently to complying venues).

2) We therefore want to create a tool that collects data on the one hand and disseminates it on the other hand (from and to the people). It would then get the data from the customers/people through ratings and give it back to the people/customers through a map displaying the venues with their level of compliance. 

July 26, 2018 at 6:26 AM
Created by jonathan_david
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3.0

As previously said:

1) We see more potential in providing this data to the Greek public because it highly disapproves non-compliance and is therefore likely to change its behavior (e.g. start going more frequently to complying venues).

We therefore want to create a tool that collects data on the one hand and disseminates it on the other hand (from and to the people). It would then get the data from the customers/people through ratings and give it back to the people/customers through a map displaying the venues with their level of compliance. 

2) We redefined/narrowed down our problem definition by deciding we would especially focus on the lack of data regarding tobacco compliance.

      We discussed the problem definition more in detail and came to the conclusion that the lack of accurate data about tobacco compliance in public venues available for the public is the problem we would focus on.

      We identified and discussed two different ways of crowdsourcing to collect this data (either through customers or directly through sensors) and thought using the advantage of the large number of customers would be beneficial 

July 26, 2018 at 6:29 AM
Created by jonathan_david
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1.0

I) Initial problem Definition: introduction to our problem (wide)

There is a major problem related to health that many countries are nowadays facing: non-compliance with smoke-free laws in public places (venues, indoors offices, health care facilities etc). (i.e. people smoke in public places although they are not allowed to do so)

The problem of non-compliance is though part of another bigger issue: the burden of tobacco on development. Indeed, by affecting public health and increasing its costs, tobacco represents a major burden for many countries around the world, especially for developing ones. The effects of smoking can be felt at the global level (countries, cities) and the local level (smokers as well as non-smokers). All of those agents are directly or indirectly affected by smoking.

In order to improve global health and reduce the financial costs induced by tobacco, there is a need today to monitor smoking better and reduce illegal smoke in public places. As a result, both public health and economic costs would be reduced and many countries would thus be able to take or follow the path of development with more efficiency.

personal comments:

  • this problem definition is very broad (maybe too much)
  • It is good as A first introduction but we should narrow it down and refine it when we'll pitch our project

II) Initial idea

--> identifying the venues that don't comply with the smoke-free laws with the help of mobile phones and ICTs (1) just focused on non-complying venues

--> Handle this information over to the government (2)

Assumptions behind those ideas:

     - Giving the collected data to the public authorities could enable them to have a clearer picture of what is really going on in the field in terms of compliance with smoke-free laws.

      - This data would give them the possibility to both save money and be more efficient by, on the one hand, running more accurate inspections (just on the non-complying venues) and by, on the other hand, making anti-tobacco advertisement more accurately (just in the neighborhoods where the compliance rate is low).

Problem:

    - We still don't now which country we should focus on. We are thinking of Greece and Pakistan since there rate of compliance is very low.

III) Obstacles to this idea

During the challenge, we found out that there is a lack of commitment from the (Greek) governments to enforcing the smoke-free laws in public venues like restaurants or bars. Just giving specific data about which venue is breaking the laws to governments is therefore not enough since they will probably make no effort to run more inspections or fine the non-complying venues.

July 26, 2018 at 9:14 AM
Created by jonathan_david
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User experience

<!--[if !supportLists]-->1)    <!--[endif]-->Visiting the “A CleanAir Greece” website

<!--[if !supportLists]-->2)    <!--[endif]-->Click on the link to fill out the survey

<!--[if !supportLists]-->3)    <!--[endif]-->The survey (ushahidi, epicollect or kobatoolbox) opens and can be filled out

[3.1) Verification of the survey by analyzing the picture]

<!--[if !supportLists]-->4)    <!--[endif]-->The survey is submitted

<!--[if !supportLists]-->5)    <!--[endif]-->Initial feedback and thank you

<!--[if !supportLists]-->6)    <!--[endif]-->Redirection to the website

<!--[if !supportLists]-->7)    <!--[endif]-->See map on website (with own input highlighted to directly see own contribution)

<!--[if !supportLists]-->8)    <!--[endif]-->See all the data by clicking on the dot

 

Technical procedure

<!--[if !supportLists]-->1)    <!--[endif]-->Survey is submitted (data collected)

<!--[if !supportLists]-->2)    <!--[endif]-->Download of CSV (after each new survey submitted à real-time)

<!--[if !supportLists]-->3)    <!--[endif]-->Combine surveys with a similar location (certain range) and the same type of place and aggregate the data of type of non-compliance

[3.1) Potentially evaluating and correcting the summarization of step 3]

<!--[if !supportLists]-->4)    <!--[endif]-->Get an average location of all the aggregated surveys

<!--[if !supportLists]-->5)    <!--[endif]-->Map with a dot projected on the average location

<!--[if !supportLists]-->6)    <!--[endif]-->Show total number of reported surveys for this dot

<!--[if !supportLists]-->7)    <!--[endif]-->Show total number of type of non-compliance

[7.1.) Change of color illustrating the severity of non-compliance (number of surveys, type of non-compliance)]

<!--[if !supportLists]-->8)    <!--[endif]-->By clicking, pop up of all individual survey results

July 26, 2018 at 10:46 AM
Created by jonas
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August 2, 2018 at 12:40 PM
Created by jonathan_david and jonas
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We were grouped up with the "At Your Cervix" team and told them one of our current issues.

Issue: How to find a good location for the first testing of our project (pilot)

Provided solution: Don't choose the place and then look for potential contributors but make this choice dependent on any kind of champions that might exist. In addition of the target groups we wanted to reach out anyway, they proposed more options such as specific facebook groups, professors doing research (and potentially in touch with certain student groups) or eco-tourist hostels whose customers are often very aware of health issues.

We agree that looking for specific champions that help support our project is important and acknowledge all their new proposals. It is kind of in accordance with our plans anyway so we think implementing this solution would work out.

August 2, 2018 at 12:46 PM
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August 3, 2018 at 11:24 AM
Created by jonathan_david
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We briefly introduced our idea via email (24.07.2018)

We received an answer emphasizing their openness and interest into finding out more about our project (30.07.2018)

We finished our draft website and survey to present it to them and added more details about our project.

August 6, 2018 at 5:17 AM
Created by jonas
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Trikala is a rare exception regarding the political commitment to enforce the Greek smoke-free laws.

Phone call (03.08.2018) to briefly introduce our idea and they seemed to be open and interested in more information. 

We sent an email with further details (03.08.2018) including a link to our draft website and survey

August 6, 2018 at 5:20 AM
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August 6, 2018 at 5:23 AM
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We met with Siddhartha from WHO who introduced us their project to improve the survey about compliance with tobacco control laws. Currently, there are five experts for each country that separately evaluate the countries compliance for different types of places. Their plan is to improve this system by increasing the number of experts to more than 40 (from different areas of the country) and using crowdsourcing. There will be a map with predesigned places and individuals can go there and answer certain questions for a period of 90 days. Right now, pilots in Thailand and Chile are in the planning stage.

Another interesting project is going on in Beijing. Since 2015, the project is developed to use WeChat in order to create maps about places with non-compliance, total smoke-free places or other provisions (like distance of selling cigarettes from schools). Using WeChat is a smart idea as it is prevelant among a large number of people and makes success more possible. After a report of a non-complianc places, one of the more than 15000 volunteers nearby is supposed to go there directly to persuade the owner to comply with the laws. Places are then shown with different colors according to the number of reports. If a place is reported more than 5 times, a public inspection will going to be rolled out.

https://www.neowin.net/news/wechat-users-are-reporting-smokers-in-beijing

http://www.minagao.com/2018/02/12/beijing-wechat-reports-a-new-approach-to-tobacco-control/

August 6, 2018 at 6:37 AM
Created by jonas
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After two years of development, the Beijing Tobacco Control Association has set up a system that uses crowdsourcing for reporting public places where smoke-free laws are not complied and combined it with an intelligent enforcement system including volunteers and the enforcement bodies. The results are displayed on a map with different colored icons for public places according to the number of their reports.

This project is included into WeChat (public service), the by far most famous messaging and social media app among Chinese smartphone users. The high general smartphone coverage in Beijing makes the project even more effective. Commonly in China, the project uses QR codes for individuals to easily access the reporting platform which are included in promotion material.

In our discussion, we addressed several issues to find out more about their project.

Advertisement:

  • Promotion of the project was/is essential to reach out individuals and let them know about this offer
  • they were using several different media (radio, TV) and public (websites of local governments) channels
  • results are published monthly in newspapers, social media and news conferences + especially a black list displaying the 20 worst rated public places

Individuals:

  • There are no benefits for individuals to participate (they have the feeling there are already many people reporting)
  • individuals can only participate if they’re actually at the place they are reporting
  • Reporting can include adding a picture but potential legal issues when taking a picture of other people were denied with the argument that they by themselves act illegally when smoking inside

Volunteers:

  • The nearest volunteer of a place that is reported are directly notified and can go there right away to help owners/managers to improve the compliance with smoke-free laws;
  • they come back about 1 week later to see if measures are successful and if this is the case the place is removed from the map
  • Volunteers are compensated and receive a training and material; they are communicating internally, e.g. to share their tasks
  • Not many owners/managers deny that the reporting incidence was incorrect but they acknowledge that the volunteers can actually help them.
  • One of the first sensors only detecting tobacco smoke is developed that volunteers can take with them to better verify their findings; technological details and prices are not revealed but from it is a bit heavy and unpractical to carry it around very long

Public authorities:

  • If a place is reported more than 5 times an enforcement body committed to run inspections automatically
  • A second map displays inspected public places

 

Clear theory of change:

  • Cheap and large data collection is ensured by the engagement of many individuals
  • Law enforcement is ensured by the engagement of the civil society (volunteers) and committed public authorities (inspection bodies); displaying these activities ensures upholding the individuals’ engagement
  • Publishing a black list regularly ensures self-enforcement of the smoke-free laws by public places (company owners don’t like to see their companies on this list) as a reputational damage is feared.

 

Potential issues:

  • Based on China-specific  features (WeChat, smartphone coverage, QR codes)
  • Reporting process is not entirely user friendly (e.g. when trying it out we noticed issues to find out the name of a place, how to upload a picture, or input the contact information)
  • More promotion is necessary: No person we talked to in Beijing were familiar that this service included in WeChat exists

August 21, 2018 at 3:01 AM
Created by jonas
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August 22, 2018 at 9:39 PM
Created by jonas
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We decided to start prototyping a tobacco smoke sensor during our stay in Beijing and Shenzhen. China is indeed a suitable place for hardware development; we then thought it would be a good opportunity to seize. If we manage to build a portable tobacco smoke detector accurate enough to confirm the presence of smoke, we could make it possible for people willing to engage further in our project could to order one on our website. This idea would be in line with the philosophy of citizen science (cf other introductions;  citizen science).

First of all, we browsed the internet for tobacco-smoke-detecting devices and found out it was really difficult to find them. The vast majority of the devices are indeed made to detect general smoke, but not tobacco-smoke specifically. The only tobacco-smoke-detector that we were able to find on the web was the Fresh Air device. As detecting specific chemicals proper to tobacco smoke seems to be a very difficult task (a particular polymer sensor needs to developed in a laboratory), our plan to be to detect tobacco smoke is to build a detector out of many sensors that easily accessible on the market and to cross their data.

short datasheet of our prototype:

- MQ7 sensor (Gas sensor V2)

- PM 2.5 sensor (SDS018)

- Grove - Air Quality Sensor v1.3

- Grove - Base shield

- Arduino Leonardo microcontroller 

- Grove - LCD RGB Backlight V4.0 screen

August 23, 2018 at 1:44 AM
Created by jonathan_david
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Hereunder you can find every step that we took to make our logo.

The pictures are put in the right order. All those pictures were made through Inkscape.

(1) Picture that we found on the internet

(2) Picture 1) with some modifications to make it look like a cigarette which is getting old (like if it was getting out of fashion).

(3) We changed plans for the logo and started to play more with the colours. Our purpose was to recall Greece by means of the colours of its flag. But the result was not enough.

(4) We designed the greek flag on the cigarette, thus making it obviously related to Greece. At this stage, we were satisfied with the look of our logo.

(5) We finally added a blue band around the picture.

October 10, 2018 at 2:32 PM
Created by jonathan_david
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Finding a suitable name for our project was a difficult task. On the one hand, It needs to sound well. On the other hand, we also want it to reflect our project. 

First, we tried to find a suitable name on our own by browsing the potential names on the web and checking whether someone else had already taken them. This part was quite discouraging; it looked like all the names were already taken. We didn't find any satisfying option. Yet it is a necessary step to take in order to see which names are still available or left.

Second, we went to the other teams of the summer school and looked for new ideas and advices for a name. This experience was rather effective. Consequently, we ended up with a few potential names in mind.

Third, we tested the same method but with the help of people who didn't know much about our project (unlike the other teams of the summer school). As a group of young students (FERMUN) came to visit us at the solution space, we took this opportunity to ask for their help. After agreeing, all of them gathered for 15 minutes and issued a small list with names.

After collecting about 10 potential and interesting names from the 2nd and 3rd part, Jonas and myself worked again on finding a name and finally agreed on the one we have today: A CleanAir Greece.

The biggest advantage of our current name is the following: "Greece" can be changed for the name of another country (A CleanAir Russia, A CleanAir Switzerland) or even of another city (A CleanAir Athens, A CleanAir Yaoundé), thus making our project's name easy to adapt according to a specific location

October 10, 2018 at 3:16 PM
Created by jonathan_david
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Why are we documenting our project?

  • to share all the experiences/knowledge we gathered while working on our project for about 2 months
  • leave behind what we have (thus preventing our efforts to sink into oblivion)
  • let other people see what we did and thereby giving them the opportunity to restart or build on what has already been done
  • Documentation is therefore the core of any open source project !

Our purpose is to make our project as easy as possible to understand and grasp for someone who hasn't heard of it yet. That's why we are providing you with this guide on how to read.

How did we design our documentation?

We privileged the "idea" approach over other types of documentation approaches ( such as "time" approach, or just "subject" approach). the "idea" approach consists in dividing our project's documentation in a way that emphasizes the main stages (or ideas) that we went through while working on our project.

  • Within 2 months, we therefore mainly went through 3 stages that we will, from now on, call "ideas". Each idea generated from the obstacles we faced in the previous one (e.g. idea 3 tries to answer to the problems encountered in idea 2).
  • Boxes with a small flag (top right corner) are those that still need to be edited/completed, that we haven't finish yet

October 11, 2018 at 8:11 AM
Created by jonathan_david
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